Sessions and Events


A schedule of Annual Meeting sessions and events for each day is provided below. Please Note: an advance copy of the program will be available on this page prior to the Annual Meeting. As well, all sessions and information pertaining to the meeting will be available for review using the NASAD Annual Meeting app.

Please Note

Registration is required for the Annual Meeting. Attendees who are not able to register online in advance may register on site at the Hyatt Regency St. Louis at The Arch beginning at 11:00 a.m. on Wednesday, October 13. 

Wednesday, October 13

11:00 a.m. 6:00 p.m.

Annual Meeting Registration

1:00 p.m. 5:30 p.m.

Pre-Meeting Workshop for Individuals New to Art and Design Higher Education Administration
(Continued on Thursday 8:15 a.m – 1:00 p.m.; click here for full workshop description)

Please note: A separate fee is required and advance registration is recommended for this Pre-Meeting Workshop. It is recommended that individuals attend and participate in all sessions scheduled within the workshop. Refreshments and a box lunch on Thursday will be provided..

This workshop is intended to address several of the most important and pressing areas of concern faced by art and design leaders in the early years of their administrative careers. Faculty members with an interest in administration, and those aspiring to take on administrative roles in the future, are also welcome to attend. Each segment will involve a basic briefing on a topic, followed by ample opportunity for interaction and discussion. The content will focus on principles and approaches applicable to all types of institutions. Newly minted administrators will have an opportunity to share with and learn from their peers.

1:45 p.m. 5:30 p.m.

Workshop for Visiting Evaluators
(Continued on Wednesday 6:30 p.m. – 8:00 p.m. for a working dinner and Thursday 8:30 a.m. – 4:30 p.m.)

This annual workshop will provide training to art/design administrators interested in becoming visiting evaluators for NASAD. Fundamentals of the accreditation process will be described in detail. Significant time will be spent discussing expectations with regard to Self-Studies and Self-Study documentation. An overview of the Handbook and its constituent parts will be presented. Standards and guidelines and their application to applicant institutions will receive considerable attention as potential evaluators are guided through the process of on-site review and Visitors’ Report preparation.

(Please note: This workshop includes a working dinner on Wednesday evening to be held from 6:30 p.m. – 8:00 p.m. All participants are required to attend the working dinner.)

(Please note: This session is by invitation only. Institutional representatives interested in becoming NASAD evaluators are encouraged to contact the National Office staff for consideration for training in 2022.)

1:45 p.m. 5:30 p.m.

Workshop for Experienced Evaluators
(Continued on Wednesday 6:30 p.m. – 8:00 p.m. for a working dinner and Thursday 8:30 a.m. – 4:30 p.m.)

This annual workshop will provide training to art/design administrators who have previously been trained as evaluators and who have served as members of visiting teams. Expectations regarding the review of Self-Studies, the on-site visit, and the Visitors’ Report will be reviewed. Responsibilities specific to the team chair will be presented.

(Please note: This workshop includes a working dinner on Wednesday evening to be held from 6:30 p.m. – 8:00 p.m. All participants are required to attend the working dinner.)

(Please note: This session is by invitation only. Institutional representatives interested in becoming NASAD evaluators are encouraged to contact the National Office staff for consideration for training in 2022.)

6:30 p.m. 8:00 p.m.

Workshop for Visiting Evaluators Working Dinner

(Please note: This event is for workshop participants only. Attendance is required.)

6:30 p.m. 8:00 p.m.

Workshop for Experienced Evaluators Working Dinner

(Please note: This event is for workshop participants only. Attendance is required.)

Thursday, October 14

8:00 a.m. 6:00 p.m.

Annual Meeting Registration

8:00 a.m. 1:00 p.m.

Pre-Meeting Workshop for Seasoned Administrators
(Please note: A separate fee is required and advance registration is recommended for this Pre-Meeting Workshop. Refreshments and a box lunch will be provided.) (click here for full workshop description)

The responsibilities of the art/design administrator are diverse and multifaceted. Each day brings new challenges and opportunities. Over time, the roles and responsibilities of an administrator often expand, change, and evolve. This pre-meeting workshop, especially designed for administrators with five or more years of experience, will include both short presentations and discussions related to various issues affecting the work of the seasoned art/design administrator. The issue of succession planning will be addressed, along with other topics of interest that will be established by the group. Experienced administrators from all types of institutions and from all levels of administration are welcome.

8:15 a.m. 1:00 p.m.

Pre-Meeting Workshop for Individuals New to Art and Design Higher Education Administration
(Continued from Wednesday) (click here for full workshop description)

This workshop is intended to address several of the most important and pressing areas of concern faced by art and design leaders in the early years of their administrative careers. Faculty members with an interest in administration, and those aspiring to take on administrative roles in the future, are also welcome to attend. Each segment will involve a basic briefing on a topic, followed by ample opportunity for interaction and discussion. The content will focus on principles and approaches applicable to all types of institutions. Newly minted administrators will have an opportunity to share with and learn from their peers.

8:30 a.m. 4:30 p.m.

Workshop for Visiting Evaluators
(Please note: This session is a continuation from Wednesday and by invitation only.)

8:30 a.m. 4:30 p.m.

Workshop for Experienced Evaluators
(Please note: This session is a continuation from Wednesday and by invitation only.)

11:45 a.m. 12:15 p.m.

Briefing for Facilitators, Moderators, and Recorders

This briefing will present instructions, expectations, and helpful guidelines to Annual Meeting session facilitators, moderators, and recorders. All individuals who have agreed to serve in one of these capacities should plan to attend this briefing.

12:15 p.m. 1:15 p.m.

Executive Committee Luncheon Meeting
(Please note: This event is for Executive Committee members only.)

1:30 p.m. 4:15 p.m.

Pressed to the Limit: An Exploration of the Impact Current Realities May Have on the Health and Well-Being of Artists and Designers

The mental health and well-being of art and design students, faculty, and administrators has become increasingly important within postsecondary education, and the need to consider and react to national conditions during the past year has become tantamount. For each of these three perspectives, definitive information may not always be available, as many regions are still grappling with the effects of the pandemic, political turmoil, and social unrest. At times it may feel that stability on all levels is not ensured as ramifications from these effects remain uncertain and ever-changing.

Students enrolled in collegiate programs of study already face a variety of personal challenges. The demands posed by life, family, and new environments coupled with realizations that lessons learned during highly structured high school years may not be sufficient to prepare students for the rigors of collegiate requirements, especially as they pertain to studio coursework; that time commitments and time in general must be managed proactively; and expectations as they pertain to life after college can leave students overwhelmed and unsure of how to proceed, or worse yet, unable to proceed without intervention. Additionally, art and design education places an emphasis on connecting with colleagues, one’s art, and the self—connections that may have waned during the past year due to lockdowns and closures. A separation from art and design and/or artmaking may have arisen from the monotony of online learning, as compared to the synthesis of information that arises naturally during multi-dimensional, in-person learning experiences. All of this may be coupled as well with a pervasive pessimism held by students who perceive that today’s problems are their responsibility to address and solve, regardless of how large or complicated they may be. Not all students are aware of opportunities that exist for assistance or even if they are aware, are reluctant to reach out to utilize the assistance available. In some cases, students with the greatest needs may be those least likely to seek necessary help regardless of the institutional resources available.

These realities also place pressure on art and design institutions devoting their expertise, energies, and resources to educating these students—institutions, their faculties, and their communities that are aware that student issues must be addressed or at least kept in check if artistic success is to have a chance of being realized. Noting that student needs are growing in these areas, there is no doubt that institutions may or will become hard-pressed to serve the demand, and unprepared to address the depth and breadth of these and other related issues.

Although different in nature, faculty members and administrators too are grappling with a wide range of challenges and pressures. Throughout the past eighteen months, faculty members have faced the need to create and modify various forms of content delivery while maintaining rigorous approaches to artmaking, design, creative practice, pedagogy, scholarship, and research during an upended period of time. Faculty loads and responsibilities have expanded exponentially in some cases. Administrators have also faced a growing number and complexity of challenges as they seek to understand the breadth of many issues that have arisen. While administrators may have faced the need to become experts in new areas, difficulties arise when colleagues who typically convene and develop policies in person are not physically present with one another. Additionally, new and ever-changing issues can distract administrators from traditional and continuing responsibilities that have long since been established as crucial to their institution’s ongoing success. Where do administrators turn for help or solace when burnout prevails, stakes continue to rise higher, and answers are either unavailable or elusive?

The myriad problems faced by students, faculty, and administrators suggest that institution-wide initiatives focusing on the development of specific approaches which assist in the maintenance and care of one’s mental health are of vital importance. These approaches could offer to individuals help in defining their breaking points, providing guidance and support to others, and recognizing when there is a critical need for help. Attendees will consider how the issues above may/will affect the capacity of individuals under and facing such pressures to function, endure, move forward, succeed, and flourish, particularly when confronting a cycle of frustration, confusion, worry, anger, and/or anxiety.

This three-part session will consist of 1) a presentation focusing on salient issues which explore both individual and organizational perspectives as they pertain to the mental health and well-being of students, faculty, and administrators, 2) moderated roundtable discussion groups assigned by geographic region which will provide an opportunity for attendees to share and explore ideas and information, and 3) a full-group dialogue session in which each roundtable group will have an opportunity to share with all attendees a distillation of the topics it discussed during the roundtable session.

In addition to the issues outlined above, participants also will consider also questions such as the following: What conditions must prevail if an institution is to mount a campus-wide approach and related or associated initiatives that not only address the current needs of students, faculty, and administration, but as well, encourage a holistic approach to personal well-being? What are the components of such an approach? Should initiatives be integrated into everyday operations, advising conversations, annual review practices, campus-life activities, professional development opportunities? If so, in what ways? How can forms of awareness and engagement that are necessary to promote well-being be generated, and by who?

1:30 p.m. 2:30 p.m.

Presentation of Salient Issues

2:45 p.m. 3:30 p.m.

Roundtable Discussion by State

Each roundtable discussion group will serve as a forum where individuals will be asked to consider important issues of student, faculty, and administrator health and wellness in detail, formulating scenarios, strategies, and creative and innovative possibilities that can assist institutions not only to prepare for and deftly manage current issues related to well-being, but work to proactively advance efforts that promote success for all involved.

3:45 p.m. 4:15 p.m.

Sharing Potential Approaches and Solutions

Recorders from each discussion group will present brief summary reports which will provide overviews of the salient issues discussed, as well as ideas and approaches for consideration as administrators work to address local issues and challenges. Time for open discussion will be provided.

4:30 p.m. 5:45 p.m.

Annual Reporting Requirements: Accreditation Audit, Affirmation Statement, Supplemental Annual Report, HEADS Data Survey

This session will provide an overview of specific reporting requirements for NASAD member institutions including the Accreditation Audit, Affirmation Statement, Supplemental Annual Report, and the HEADS Data Survey, and an in-depth review of procedures for online submission of the HEADS Data Survey for degree-granting institutions. A section-by-section overview of the Survey will explain in detail the Survey submission process, types of data collected, and collection mechanisms. Questions will be taken at the end of the presentation.

4:30 p.m. 5:45 p.m.

An Orientation to NASAD: Briefing on Structures and Services

This session will address NASAD’s functional role as an independent accrediting organization, with particular focus on its structural and organizational connections to regional, national, and other specialized accrediting bodies, state and federal governing bodies, and to applicant and member institutions. It will also provide an overview of the structure, resources, operations, and decision-making patterns of NASAD, with special attention to the benefits and responsibilities of accredited institutional membership. One emphasis will be on the ways the Association and its work assist administrators as they work to fulfill their local responsibilities. Individuals attending the NASAD meeting for the first time are especially encouraged to attend. Time for questions will be provided.

4:30 p.m. 5:45 p.m.

Briefing: NASAD Administrative Support Resources

This session will enumerate and explain the purposes of several sets of NASAD publications designed to assist institutions in the formulation of local proposals and policies. These supplemental publications touch upon issues including faculty work, promotion, and tenure; the duties of administrators; planning and future analysis; assessment; and communication with others, explaining the principles, aspirations, and suggested considerations for the development of effective and quality programs in art and design. A brief look at the NASAD website, highlighting the location of various online resources, will be offered.

5:45 p.m. 6:45 p.m.

Reception for the Association
(Please note: This event includes a cash bar.)

This reception offers an opportunity for attendees to establish connections with individuals new to art and design administration and connect with colleagues. The President of the Association will offer a greeting and will introduce the members of the NASAD Board of Directors.

6:15 p.m. 6:30 p.m.

Board of Directors New Member Orientation
(Please note: This event is for new Board of Directors members only.)

6:30 p.m. 9:00 p.m.

Board of Directors Dinner and Business Meeting
(Please note: This event is for Board of Directors members only.)

Friday, October 15

7:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m.

Annual Meeting Registration

7:15 a.m. 8:45 a.m.

Continental Breakfast for the Association

8:45 a.m. 10:00 a.m.

Plenary Session: Business Meeting

Call to Order
Determination of Quorum
Welcome to Members and Guests
Introduction of Newly Accredited Institutional Members
Report of the Commission on Accreditation
Report of the Committee on Ethics
Report of the Treasurer
Announcements
Report of the Executive Director
Action on Proposed Handbook Changes
Election of Officers
Report of the President
New Business
Adjournment

10:15 a.m. 12:00 noon

The Roles and Values of the Studio Critique

In yesterday’s session which focused in part on mental health and well-being of students, attendees discussed and explored the pressures facing students today, noting that student success is inextricably linked to student wellness. Informed by these understandings and reaffirming that there is a collective interest in assisting students not only to develop skills and acquire knowledge, but to attain subject-matter competence and expertise, during this session, attendees, guided by the presenter, will consider the integral roles and inherent values of the studio critique in general and as it applies to various and specific aspects of art and design education. Studio critique, employed as a ubiquitous and indispensable way to analyze and assess student work and progress, will be explored for the roles it plays 1) in promoting student development, 2) in enhancing student learning, and 3) as a helpful mechanism that can be used to inform pedagogical approaches. Participants will consider questions such as: What are some benefits of the studio critique process—for the student, and for the faculty? What challenges does the critique process present—for the student, for students participating in the process, and for the faculty? Does/should an institution’s approach to critique vary by studio discipline, by instructor? What is the impact of an institution’s approach to critique process on the institution’s studio culture, particularly noting that studio culture has a substantial impact on the work/life balance of its students? What are the intended expectations of the critique process? Are these expectations being realized? If not, should the pedagogical approach(es) of the institution and institution’s faculty be reconsidered? Immediately following the presentation, attendees, remaining in small discussion groups, will engage in conversation moderated by the presenter, during which time attendees will consider the ways critiques and feedback can be used constructively to assist students to affirm/rethink/reset expectations; rekindle/reignite student focus and interest; spur curiosity; cajole students to experiment and take risks with their art/design making; develop connection and create community; and initiate dialogue, exchange, and thoughtful interaction. Ample time for group discussion will be provided.

12:00 noon 1:30 p.m.

Luncheon for the Association

1:45 p.m. 2:45 p.m.

Learning Environments: Evolving and Adapting to Support Creative Professions

Without question, students respond to the environments in which they are placed. Learning environments, therefore, can have a considerable effect on the way students learn. Learning environments result from a combination of conditions, for example: location, context, and culture. Each of these variables can be changed/enhanced to modify learning outcomes. The availability and use of space and resources is often guided—if not dictated by—a number of internal and external factors and conditions. Today there exists a variety of types of learning spaces, such as the lecture hall, designated maker spaces, informal spaces on campus, community settings, and various virtual environments. These learning spaces/environments typically include various combinations of physical collaboration and virtual interaction, the balance and combination of which is often informed by and aligned with desired learning outcomes. The one constant all learning spaces currently share is that content is everywhere—learning has gone mobile, and the possibilities that such conditions cause to arise as we have witnessed first-hand in these last months are plentiful. This would seem to bode well for the education and training of artists and designers—individuals who not only adapt easily to various and differing environments, but who will enter employment environments as disparate as can be imagined given the rate of change in art/design fields and their marketplaces. In this session, attendees will consider how information pertaining to students, propensities, marketplace conditions, and economic realities can be harnessed to assist institutions to create learning environments that not only support educational goals and objectives but also effectively enhance the learning opportunities available to students and assist them to prepare for current employment environments, as well as those anticipated in future. Following the presentation, time for questions and discussion will be provided.

3:00 p.m. 4:00 p.m.

Roundtables by Size and Type of Institution

Each roundtable discussion group will serve as a forum where individuals will be asked to consider the impact learning environments can have on the education and training of art/design students, and how learning environments can be created or manipulated to achieve desired outcomes.

4:15 p.m. 5:45 p.m.

Using HEADS Statistical Data for Institutional Planning and Projection

The institutional research data gathered and compiled by the Higher Education Arts Data Services project constitute a unique and valuable resource for art/design executives at degree-granting institutions. This session will provide a detailed overview of statistics contained in the HEADS Data Summaries (the aggregate reports compiled annually from HEADS Data Surveys), the use of HEADS Data Summaries and Special Reports for comparison among specific peer institutions, and potential uses for HEADS data in administrative planning.

4:15 p.m. 5:45 p.m.

Briefing for NASAD Evaluators

This annual briefing is offered for individuals currently trained and serving as NASAD visiting evaluators. It will provide an opportunity for evaluators to refresh their knowledge of NASAD procedures, protocols, and standards, with particular focus on recent changes to the Procedures and the Handbook. Helpful reminders regarding the format, preparation, and required content of Visitors’ Reports will be provided. The potential impact of the activities of external constituencies, such as the federal government, states, and other review bodies, which may impact the accreditation process, will be discussed. Documentation required of institutions and evaluators will be highlighted, as well as sources and uses of helpful and informative publications aimed to assist institutions in the preparation of Self-Studies and evaluators in the preparation of Visitors’ Reports.

(Please note: This session is by invitation only. Institutional representatives interested in becoming NASAD evaluators are encouraged to contact the National Office staff for consideration for training in 2022.)

4:15 p.m. 5:45 p.m.

Open Forum: Historically Black Institutions

This session is designed to provide a forum where ideas and concerns of particular relevance to historically Black institutions may be discussed. Attendance is open to all interested individuals. Participants may wish to give consideration to topics of interest in advance.

4:15 p.m. 5:45 p.m.

Roundtable for Community and Two-Year Colleges

This session will provide an opportunity to brainstorm and discuss ideas and best practices of particular relevance to community and two-year colleges, such as articulation agreements, curricular alignment, credit-hour transfer between 2- and 4-year institutions, and shared success. Participants will be encouraged to share information and issues of concern faced in their daily work. Attendance is open to all interested individuals.

4:15 p.m. 5:45 p.m.

Roundtable for Independent Art and Design Institutions

Art and design executives from free-standing postsecondary institutions will have the opportunity to discuss topics of specific relevance or concern and consider with colleagues challenges and opportunities faced today by independent institutions. Topics such as fiscal planning, allocation of resources, curricular planning and programming, connecting with the community, mergers and acquisitions, higher education law and regulation will be addressed, as will those topics of interest to participants. Participants may wish to give consideration to topics in advance. The session is open to all interested individuals.

4:15 p.m. 5:45 p.m.

Roundtable for Small Art and Design Units

Administrators from small art/design units, typically with fewer than 100 majors, will have the opportunity to discuss topics of specific relevance or concern, and to pose questions to colleagues facing similar challenges and opportunities. Attendance is open to all interested individuals. Participants may wish to give consideration to topics of interest in advance.

5:45 p.m. 7:00 p.m.

Reception for the Association
(Please note: This event includes a cash bar.)

6:30 p.m. 8:30 p.m.

(back to top)

Board of Directors Dinner and Seminar Meeting
(Please note: This event is for Board of Directors members only.)

Saturday, October 16

7:00 a.m. 12:45 p.m.

Annual Meeting Registration

7:15 a.m. 8:45 a.m.

Continental Breakfast for the Association

7:30 a.m. 8:45 a.m.

Executive Committee Breakfast and Meeting
(Please note: This event is for Executive Committee members only)

8:00 a.m. 12:30 p.m.

Workshop: Preparing for NASAD Evaluation

This session will provide information and guidance concerning the self-study and visitation processes for members whose institutions are to be visited in the next two years, institutions planning to begin the NASAD evaluation process, and those formally engaged in the process. A step-by-step walk-through of the accreditation process will be provided, including confirmation of timelines and deadlines, and information regarding accreditation procedures, Self-Study formats, on-site reviews, the Visitors’ Report, the Optional Response, and Commission action. Questions will be taken during this nuts-and-bolts session. All interested individuals are welcome.

(Please note: A box lunch will be provided. Attendees are asked to register in advance.)

9:00 a.m. 10:45 a.m.

Effective Curricular Planning: Revisiting Today’s Assumptions; Articulating Tomorrow’s Expectations

Foundations courses required of students enrolling in art/design curricular programs enable students to develop fundamental skills and gain basic understandings, which are intended to support and serve as a foundation for future study in a student’s chosen discipline. Although foundations programs are or can be similar in nature, many are designed to align with departmental objectives and/or curricular intentionality. However, given the growing sophistication of art and design programs during the past several years, curricular planning has burgeoned in expectation and desired content, driven by a need to address the ever-expanding complexities of art and design disciplines, coupled with a desire to provide students with educational experiences sufficient in breadth and depth to support and advance their artistic endeavors. Although well-intended, it may be that results observed from the implementation of such changes are now prompting faculty to question whether current curricular and/or foundations experiences are truly relevant and useful. Attendees will take a step back, considering together the desired intentions and necessities of today’s programs of study and the roles curricular experiences play in the advancement of student expertise and consequently, the fields of art and design.

The panelists will address this issue from three different perspectives. First, a conversation will take place regarding how institutions can establish cultures that embrace the conditions necessary to open dialogues and/or begin conversations regarding curricular planning. Noting that the success of these conversations hinges in large part on the institution’s efforts to establish trust and respect among all involved—individuals who by their actions and words must establish conditions that build and maintain atmospheres of inclusion, open-mindedness, and engagement. Attendees will consider together the following: How the nature of conversation, the language used, and the perceptions established can affect outcomes; how arts administrators can establish or change inculcated cultures so that personal positions do not hinder conversations or prevent results which serve the institution, its students, and the greater good; how conversations enriched by diversity of thought, approach, and voice can inform effective decision-making.

A second panelist will explore aspects of the curriculum that are critical to maintain if we are to support 1) students and their future careers, 2) institutions offering art and design education, 3) the needs of society, and 4) the artforms themselves. Attendees will consider issues such as: Should the focus of the educational experience be centered on a student’s journey, a desired outcome, a regimented path? What foundational knowledge must all students possess before leaving the academy? Are students gaining the expertise needed to address the needs of society? If not, what is missing? Is breadth more important than depth? Does depth take precedence at a certain stage in an artist’s training? What delivery methods have we found to be most useful, effective, or successful? Has the pandemic taught us what can/should be let go? Do the same pedagogies work in both in-person and online settings?

Lastly, attendees will consider the nature of rigor and the important role its consideration plays in the design, implementation, and execution of curricular programs, particularly as educators work to shape academic experiences in ways that ensure students attain levels of expertise that enable them to engage as artists and designers who will contribute to and advance our society. Given the unfolding landscape before our students, and the speed with which it is changing, how might we best prepare our students for a future we cannot predict with certainty, particularly given current social conditions and technological advancements? How will we ensure that our students develop subject-specific expertise and thought processes necessary to spur them to conceive, explore, innovate, create, and discover regardless of the nature of the ever-changing landscape in which they find themselves?

Subsequent to the sharing of their thoughts and ideas, panelists, as guided by the moderator, will entertain questions, opening a dialogue among attendees intended to advance the exploration of each of the three perspectives described above.

11:00 a.m. 12:30 p.m.

The Undergraduate Degree: Facilitating Design, Review, and Implementation

From time to time, and for a variety of reasons, art/design units may decide to undertake the complex task of designing new undergraduate degree programs. There are many issues that must be considered, such as the existing mission of the institution and art/design unit, how the degree will dovetail with and support these missions, the students to be served, the coursework necessary to develop desired competencies, the availability of applicable faculty expertise, and the conditions and realities of the market. As well, resources must be considered, and consensus must be built. Only with these understandings in hand can the architecture of a degree program begin to take shape.

This session will focus on the structure of undergraduate degree programs. Differences between liberal arts and professional baccalaureate degrees will be addressed, as will structural differences between majors, minors, and areas of emphasis. Issues that arise regarding title and content consistency will be discussed. The effective use of the standards to promote and embrace creative and innovative curricular programming will be explored. In addition, application procedures and submission guidelines will be discussed, with an intent to assist art/design administrators to streamline review timelines.

(Please note: Attendees may wish to attend the Effective Curricular Planning session offered from 9:00 a.m. – 10:45 a.m. Saturday morning.)

11:00 a.m. 12:30 p.m.

Briefing: Federal Issues for Art and Design Administrators

Under the law, the federal government does not control higher education. However, the federal government does play a major role in developing conditions for the work of higher education, primarily through laws and regulations defining conditions for institutional participation in grant and student loan programs, and tax policies that influence economic conditions affecting education and the arts.

Following a brief introduction to the higher education and policy landscapes, this session will address the current political climate; various pressures on institutions; and current and prospective federal policies, laws, and regulations affecting higher education and the arts. This briefing will take a non-partisan policy analysis approach, looking at the ramifications and costs of various options and probabilities. Time for questions and discussion will be provided.

11:00 a.m. 12:30 p.m.

Creating Cogent Commission Communications

Whether developing and preparing comprehensive applications for accreditation and reaccreditation, Responses, Progress Reports, or applications for Plan Approval, Final Approval for Listing, or Substantive Change, clear and cogent material, which articulates activities at the institution while at the same time addresses standards issues, is necessary in order to conduct a successful conversation with the Commission on Accreditation. This session will offer an overview of the Handbook and the use of its contents in preparing Commission correspondence. Helpful ideas and suggestions will be provided for attendees in the process of, or planning to, develop materials for Commission review.

12:30 p.m.

(back to top)

Adjournment of the NASAD Annual Meeting