Sessions and Events


A schedule of Annual Meeting sessions and events for each day is provided below. A printed program of all sessions and events will be provided to attendees in their registration packets on site. An advance copy of the program will be published on this page prior to the meeting.

Please Note

Registration is required for the Annual Meeting. Attendees who are not able to register online in advance may register on site at the Wyndham Grand Pittsburgh Downtown beginning at 11:00 a.m. on Wednesday, October 16. 

Wednesday, October 16

9:00 a.m. 5:00 p.m.

Commission on Accreditation (continued)
(Please note: This event is for Commission members only.)

11:00 a.m. 6:00 p.m.

Annual Meeting Registration

1:00 p.m. 5:30 p.m.

Pre-Meeting Workshop for New and Aspiring Art and Design Administrators
(Continued on Thursday at 8:15 a.m.; click here for full workshop description)

Please note: A separate fee is required and advance registration is recommended for this Pre-Meeting Workshop. It is recommended that individuals attend and participate in all sessions scheduled within the workshop.

This workshop has been designed to address several of the most important areas of concern for art/design leaders in the early years of their administrative careers. Faculty members with an interest in administration, and those aspiring to take on administrative roles in the future, are also welcome to attend. Each segment will involve a basic briefing on a topic, followed by ample opportunity for interaction and discussion. The content will focus on principles and approaches applicable to all types of institutions.

1:45 p.m. 8:00 p.m.

Workshop for Visiting Evaluators
(Continued on Thursday 9:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m.)

This annual workshop will provide training to art/design administrators interested in becoming visiting evaluators for NASAD. Fundamentals of the accreditation process will be described in detail. Significant time will be spent discussing expectations with regard to Self-Studies and Self-Study documentation. An overview of the Handbook and its constituent parts will be presented. Standards and guidelines and their application to applicant institutions will receive considerable attention as potential evaluators are guided through the process of on-site review and Visitors’ Report preparation.

Please note: This session includes a working dinner on Wednesday evening. All participants are required to attend the working dinner.

Please note: This session is by invitation only. Institutional representatives interested in becoming NASAD evaluators are encouraged to contact the National Office staff for consideration for training in 2020.

1:45 p.m. 8:00 p.m.

Workshop for Experienced Evaluators
(Continued on Thursday 9:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m.)

This annual workshop will provide training to art/design administrators who have previously been trained as evaluators and who have served as members of visiting teams. Expectations regarding the review of Self-Studies, the on-site visit, and the Visitors’ Report will be reviewed. Responsibilities specific to the team chair will be presented.

Please note: This session includes a working dinner on Wednesday evening. All participants are required to attend the working dinner.

Please note: This session is by invitation only. Institutional representatives interested in becoming NASAD evaluators are encouraged to contact the National Office staff for consideration for training in 2020.

Thursday, October 17

8:00 a.m. 6:00 p.m.

Annual Meeting Registration

8:00 a.m. 12:00 noon

Pre-Meeting Workshop for Seasoned Art and Design Administrators
Please note: A separate fee is required and advance registration is recommended for this Pre-Meeting Workshop. (click here for full workshop description)

The responsibilities of the art/design administrator are diverse and multifaceted. Each day brings new challenges and opportunities. Over time, the roles and responsibilities of an administrator often expand, change, and evolve. This pre-meeting workshop, especially designed for administrators with five or more years of experience, will include both short presentations and discussions related to various issues affecting the work of art/design administrators. The issue of succession planning will be addressed, along with other areas of interest that will be established by the group. Experienced administrators from all types of institutions and from all levels of administration are welcome.

8:15 a.m. 1:00 p.m.

Pre-Meeting Workshop for New and Aspiring Art and Design Administrators
(Continued from Wednesday, October 16. Please note: A separate fee is required and advance registration is recommended for this Pre-Meeting Workshop. (click here for full workshop description)

This workshop has been designed to address several of the most important areas of concern for art/design leaders in the early years of their administrative careers. Faculty members with an interest in administration, and those aspiring to take on administrative roles in the future, are also welcome to attend. Each segment will involve a basic briefing on a topic, followed by ample opportunity for interaction and discussion. The content will focus on principles and approaches applicable to all types of institutions.

9:00 a.m. 12:00 noon

Commission on Accreditation (continued)
(Please note: This event is for Commission members only.)

9:00 a.m. 5:00 p.m.

Workshop for Visiting Evaluators
(Please note: This session is a continuation from Wednesday and by invitation only.)

9:00 a.m. 5:00 p.m.

Workshop for Experienced Evaluators
(Please note: This session is a continuation from Wednesday and by invitation only.)

12:15 p.m. 1:15 p.m.

Executive Committee Luncheon Meeting
(Please note: This event is for Executive Committee members only.)

12:45 p.m. 1:15 p.m.

Briefing for Moderators and Recorders

This briefing, conducted by NASAD staff, will present instructions, expectations, and helpful hints to Annual Meeting session moderators and recorders. All individuals who have agreed to serve in one of these capacities should plan to attend this briefing.

1:30 p.m. 4:30 p.m.

Student Success: The Secret to Retention; The Antidote to Attrition

Last year attendees focused their attention on the topic of Enrollment Management. Issues such as tapping into the pipeline, balancing the cohort, and stemming declining numbers were considered; a glimpse of anticipated trends and projections was offered. Having developed a firm grasp of what appears to be in store for institutions of higher learning over the next decade, particularly with regard to art and design programs, and wanting to advance the conversation further, during this session attendees will shift their focus from defining the problem to discussing and designing effective action plans intended to bolster student success, reduce attrition, and enhance student learning.

Today’s session will be divided into three parts:  Framing the Issue; Discussing Options, Opportunities, and Possibilities; and Sharing Potential Approaches and Solutions. A panel of presenters will introduce and frame the issue. Following this session, attendees will break into discussion groups organized by size and type of institution. Each group will be tasked with the responsibility to “work the problem” with an eye to developing potential approaches and solutions, which will be shared with all attendees during a concluding summary session.

1:30 p.m. 2:30 p.m.

Framing the Issue

What characterizes student success—strong retention numbers, low attrition numbers, high grades, graduation rates? Although numerical benchmarks are important to consider and helpful in informing the conversation, it is important to remember that “not everything that can be counted counts and not everything that counts can be counted” (attributed to Albert Einstein). Understanding this distinction as well as the nature of art/design study and the conditions that must prevail if expertise as a practicing artist or designer is to be attained, attendees will consider the value and benefits that can result from efforts to promote student success through means such as enhancing the level of institutional support offered to and engagement in the students. These efforts can include making available support systems and communities, curricular programs that are relevant and enable students to bridge their paths from the academy to the workforce, various learning models, and initiatives that support personal development and advancement.

Success in this regard is dependent upon a number of factors, such as a well-crafted and laser-focused mission that is not only understood and embraced by administrators and faculty, but that articulates the institution’s vision and guides its pursuits; a culture of service which is pervasively student-centered; the clear articulation of student expectations in terms of rigor and the acquisition of knowledge and skills; and institutional efforts that are widespread with the intent to reach the full student body including international students, students of color, first generation students, Pell Grant-eligible students, and the like.

Presenters will explore these issues in depth. Time for questions and discussion will be provided.

2:30 p.m. 3:45 p.m.

Discussing Options, Opportunities, and Possibilities

Each breakout discussion group will serve as a forum where individuals will be asked to “work the problem,” formulating scenarios, strategies, and creative and innovative solutions that can assist institutions not only to prepare for and deftly manage the changes that are anticipated to take place in the higher education landscape, but work to proactively advance efforts to promote student success.

Please note: Discussion comments and issues noted by session recorders that have the potential to inform the future work of NASAD will be provided to and considered by the NASAD Executive Committee.

Discussion groups will be organized as follows:

Free-Standing Art and Design Institutions
Community and Two-Year Colleges
Private Institutions (Enrollments 1–150)
Private Institutions (Enrollments 151+)
Public Institutions (Enrollments 1–150)
Public Institutions (Enrollments 151–300)
Public Institutions (Enrollments 301–500)
Public Institutions (Enrollments 501+)

4:00 p.m. 4:30 p.m.

Sharing Potential Approaches and Solutions

Recorders from each discussion group will present brief summary reports which will provide overviews of the salient issues discussed, as well as ideas and options that may spur administrators to find and devise effective local solutions. If time allows, open discussion will follow.

4:45 p.m. 5:45 p.m.

Annual Reporting Requirements: Accreditation Audit, Affirmation Statement, Supplemental Annual Report, HEADS Data Survey

This session will provide an overview of specific reporting requirements for NASAD member institutions including the Accreditation Audit, Affirmation Statement, Supplemental Annual Report, and the HEADS Data Survey, and an in-depth review of procedures for online submission of the HEADS Data Survey for degree-granting institutions. A section-by-section overview of the Survey will explain in detail the Survey submission process, types of data collected, and collection mechanisms. Questions will be taken at the end of the presentation.

4:45 p.m. 5:45 p.m.

An Orientation to NASAD: Briefing on Structures and Services

This session will address NASAD’s functional role as an independent accrediting organization, with particular focus on its structural and organizational connections to regional, national, and other specialized accrediting bodies, state and federal governing bodies, and to applicant and member institutions. It will also provide an overview of the structure, resources, operations, and decision-making patterns of NASAD, with special attention to the benefits and responsibilities of accredited institutional membership. One emphasis will be on the ways the Association and its work assist administrators as they work to fulfill their local responsibilities. Individuals attending the NASAD meeting for the first time are especially encouraged to attend. Time for questions will be provided.

4:45 p.m. 5:45 p.m.

Hearing: Specific Operational Standards For All Institutions Of Higher Education For Which NASAD Is The Designated Institutional Accreditor; Specific Operational Standards For Proprietary Institutions Of Higher Education

2019 will mark the last year of the Association’s multiyear comprehensive review of its accreditation standards. This year’s hearing will take comments on two remaining sections of the Handbook which address accreditation standards: Specific Operational Standards for All Institutions of Higher Education for which NASAD is the Designated Institutional Accreditor, and Specific Operational Standards for Proprietary Institutions of Higher Education. An electronic copy of the hearing text will be sent to all Annual Meeting attendees in advance of the meeting. Participants are encouraged to bring a marked copy to the hearing.

Please note: NASAD welcomes comment pertaining to its accreditation standards. Feedback may be forwarded to the National Office at any time.

4:45 p.m. 5:45 p.m.

Briefing: NASAD Administrative Support Resources

This session will enumerate and explain the purposes of several sets of NASAD publications designed to assist institutions in the formulation of local proposals and policies. These supplemental publications touch upon issues including faculty work, promotion, and tenure; the duties of administrators; planning and future analysis; assessment; and communication with others, explaining the principles, aspirations, and suggested considerations for the development of effective and quality programs in art and design. A brief look at the NASAD website, highlighting the location of various online resources, will be offered.

5:45 p.m. 6:45 p.m.

Reception for the Association
(Please note: This event has a cash bar)

6:15 p.m. 6:30 p.m.

Board of Directors New Member Orientation
(Please note: This event is for new Board of Directors members only)

6:30 p.m. 9:00 p.m.

Board of Directors Dinner and Business Meeting
(Please note: This event is for Board of Directors members only.)

Friday, October 18

7:15 a.m. 8:45 a.m.

Continental Breakfast for the Association

8:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m.

Annual Meeting Registration

8:45 a.m. 10:00 a.m.

Plenary Session: Business Meeting

Call to Order
Determination of Quorum
Welcome to Members and Guests
Introduction of Newly Accredited Institutional Members
Report of the Commission on Accreditation
Report of the Committee on Ethics
Report of the Treasurer
Report of the Executive Director
Action on Proposed Handbook Changes
Election of Officers
Report of the President
New Business
Adjournment

10:15 a.m. 11:15 a.m.

Keynote Address

11:30 a.m. 4:00 p.m.

Pushing Beyond Established Boundaries: Promoting Divergent Thinking, Creative Solutions, And Innovative Practices

The success of an art and design program is predicated on a number of enduring conditions. Paramount among them is the ability of administrators holding responsibility for the long-term health, well-being, and relevance of the program to offer to those with a vested interest in the program the permission to push beyond established and comfortable boundaries and, with purposeful regularity absent preconceived notions or assumptions, envision the future of collegiate study in the fields of art and design. Although at first this concept may seem foreign, it is important to remember that this is precisely the approach taken day-in and day-out by art makers and designers as they conceive and create their own bodies of work.

In this two-part session, attendees will take time to imagine the future of art and design education and training specifically as it relates to options, opportunities, and outcomes that can result from well-considered and crafted external partnerships and informed curricular planning.

11:30 a.m. 12:30 p.m.

Pushing Beyond Established Boundaries: Promoting Divergent Thinking, Creative Solutions, And Innovative PracticesEstablishing External Partnerships

In this day and age, businesses are looking to institutions to assist them to expand their knowledge base; communities are looking to institutions to assist them to address local issues and challenges; faculty and staff are seeking opportunities; and institutions are pursuing collaborations that will serve the public good, bolster resource bases, and assist them to remain relevant and competitive. There is no question that carefully crafted external partnerships can result in win-win situations for all involved. Todays attendees will consider the evolving nature of partnerships, the principles that must be considered, the complexities inherent in establishing partnerships, as well as the assured challenges, anticipated risks, potential perils, and possible rewards. Examples of successful practices will be offered.

2:15 p.m. 3:00 p.m.

Pushing Beyond Established Boundaries: Promoting Divergent Thinking, Creative Solutions, And Innovative PracticesInformed Curricular Planning

Do art and design administrators face an imperative today which suggests that all art and design curricular programs must change with great regularity in order for them to remain effective and relevant? Must long-standing curricular programs and our approaches to these programs, which have been in place for decades, now be left behind to make way for the future, and if so, what does the future hold in store? Can the old exist along side the new—should it, must it? What roles do resource availability, funding, administrative support, and personal agendas play in decision-making?

Although these issues are important aspects of and can inform the discussion, institutional considerations and therefore planning must focus on and take into account the ability of each curricular program anticipated and currently in place to not only enhance student learning on various levels and dimensions, but as well, to ensure that students, throughout their programs of study and related activities, acquire subject matter knowledge sufficient in depth and breadth to prepare them for their futures and assist them to become successful and contributing practicing artists and designers. Attendees will be asked to explore the following:  What must students know and be able to do now, in the future? What expertise/skills in a defined subject matter area are ideal, important, critical? How can expertise be acquired/skills be developed? What barriers stand in the way of the acquisition of expertise/development of skills? How can they be overcome? How might the approach to teaching subject matter knowledge in a defined subject area change in the foreseeable future? What new areas of study and associated bodies of knowledge are expected/anticipated?

Attendees will have the opportunity to consider and discuss in depth the issues noted above as they relate to six areas of study:  Foundations, Studio Art, Design, Art/Design History, Art Education, and General Studies. The six sessions will be repeated; attendees are asked to choose and attend two of the six.

3:15 p.m. 4:00 p.m.

Pushing Beyond Established Boundaries: Promoting Divergent Thinking, Creative Solutions, And Innovative PracticesInformed Curricular Planning
(Repeat of 2:15 p.m. – 3:00 p.m.)

12:30 p.m. 2:00 p.m.

Luncheon for the Association

2:15 p.m. 3:00 p.m.

Pushing Beyond Established Boundaries: Promoting Divergent Thinking, Creative Solutions, And Innovative PracticesInformed Curricular Planning
(See full description under main heading at 11:30 a.m.)

2:15 p.m. 3:00 p.m.

Mergers and Acquisitions: Promises and Pitfalls

Mergers and acquisitions—activities once considered predominantly the domain of the corporate, rather than academic world—typically result in the consolidation of ownership and assets among entities. Such transactions can be driven by desires and/or necessities to pool the collective resources of entities, or to protect and maintain aspects of an entity that could be washed away given market conditions and external pressures. Spurred by realities such as tightening budgets and declining enrollments, mergers and acquisitions have arrived at the doorstep of the academy. Over the last decade, higher education has witnessed an unprecedented uptick in the number of mergers and acquisitions attempted and completed.

The tangible aspects of consolidation, such as the melding of governance structures, operations, space, equipment and the like often lend themselves to and are easily incorporated within written contracts which identify and delineate conditions and expectations down to minute detail. However, the intangibles, specifically the curriculum and the collective expertise of the faculty, that which is considered to be the beating heart of the enterprise—are not so easy to delineate, and therefore decisions regarding these areas often tend to be based on verbal understandings and tacit agreements, and are sealed in deals marked by what is assumed to be a binding handshake. Today’s session will outline good practices as they apply to the tangible and the intangible, as well as potential pitfalls and how to recognize and avoid them. Time for questions and discussion will be offered.

3:15 p.m. 4:00 p.m.

Pushing Beyond Established Boundaries: Promoting Divergent Thinking, Creative Solutions, And Innovative PracticesInformed Curricular Planning
(Repeat of 2:15 p.m. – 3:00 p.m. See full description under main heading at 11:30 a.m.)

3:15 p.m. 4:00 p.m.

Open Forum: Game Design

The Association is exploring the possibility and efficacy of developing a designated set of standards for a professional undergraduate degree with a major in game design. This open discussion provides the first opportunity for representatives of member and colleague institutions to discuss this issue and other curricular issues related to a degree that provides a major in game design.

3:15 p.m. 4:00 p.m.

Open Forum: Accessibility

In 2018, Annual Meeting attendees had the opportunity to discuss issues pertaining to accessibility—a topic that is outlined in detail in the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) of 1990, as amended, and its associated regulations—specifically how institutional representatives can heighten not only their awareness, but that of students as they prepare for what they may encounter as they enter the workforce. Participants will continue this important dialogue, sharing information, ideas, and successful practices, and contemplating various approaches that can be employed by institutions to build cultures of awareness as they relate specifically to institutional mission and curricular offerings.

4:15 p.m. 5:30 p.m.

Designing an Undergraduate Degree

From time to time, and for a variety of reasons, art/design units may decide to undertake the complex task of designing new undergraduate degree programs. There are many issues that must be considered, such as the existing missions of the institution and art/design unit, how the degree will dovetail with and support these missions, the students to be served, the coursework necessary to develop desired competencies, and the availability of applicable faculty expertise. As well, resources must be considered, and consensus must be built. Only with these understandings in hand can the architecture of a degree begin to take shape.

This session will focus on the structure of undergraduate degree programs. Differences between liberal arts and professional baccalaureate degrees will be addressed, as will structural differences between majors, minors, and areas of emphasis. Issues that arise regarding title and content consistency will be discussed. As well, the effective use of the standards to promote and embrace creative and innovative curricular programming will be explored.

4:15 p.m. 5:30 p.m.

Using HEADS Statistical Data for Institutional Planning and Projection

The institutional research data gathered and compiled by the Higher Education Arts Data Services project constitute a unique and valuable resource for art/design executives at degree-granting institutions. This session will provide a detailed overview of statistics contained in the HEADS Data Summaries (the aggregate reports compiled annually from HEADS Data Surveys), the use of HEADS Data Summaries and Special Reports for comparison among specific peer institutions, and potential uses for HEADS data in administrative planning.

4:15 p.m. 5:30 p.m.

Open Forum: Historically Black Institutions

This session is designed to provide a forum where ideas and concerns of particular relevance to historically black institutions may be discussed. Attendance is open to all interested individuals. Participants may wish to give consideration to topics of interest in advance.

4:15 p.m. 5:30 p.m.

Roundtable for Community and Two-Year Colleges

This interactive session will provide an opportunity to brainstorm and discuss ideas and best practices of particular relevance to community and two-year colleges. Participants will be encouraged to share information and issues of concern faced in their daily work. Time for reflection and discussion will be provided. Attendance is open to all interested individuals.

5:30 p.m. 6:30 p.m.

Reception for the Association
(Please note: This event has a cash bar)

6:15 p.m. 8:30 p.m.

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Board of Directors Dinner and Seminar Meeting
(Please note: This event is for Board of Directors members only.)

Saturday, October 19

7:00 a.m. 12:30 p.m.

Annual Meeting Registration

7:15 a.m. 8:45 a.m.

Continental Breakfast for the Association

7:30 a.m. 8:45 a.m.

Executive Committee Breakfast and Meeting
(Please note: This event is for Executive Committee members only)

8:00 a.m. 12:30 p.m.

Workshop: Preparing for NASAD Evaluation

This session will provide information and guidance concerning the self-study and visitation processes for members whose institutions are to be visited in the next two years, institutions planning to begin the NASAD evaluation process, and those formally engaged in the process. A step-by-step walk-through of the accreditation process will be provided, including confirmation of timelines and deadlines, and information regarding accreditation procedures, Self-Study formats, on-site reviews, the Visitors’ Report, the Optional Response, and Commission action. Questions will be taken during this nuts-and-bolts session. All interested individuals are welcome.

Please note: A box lunch will be provided. Attendees are asked to register in advance.

9:00 a.m. 10:30 a.m.

Establishing Buy-In and Engagement: Nuts and Bolts, and Barriers

An aspect critical to the success of any art and design program is the existence of a pervasive culture of buy-in. Successful buy-in is characterized by the acceptance of and support offered to initiatives, schemes, dreams, and necessities of the art/design unit. Today’s session will consider how buy-in can be established with upper administrators, the faculty, and students, and as well, nurtured and sustained. Following an introduction by each of the three panelists, attendees will consider the following questions:

With regard to upper administrators:

  • What effective tactics can art/design administrators employ to generate support for innovative ideas, particularly with regard to curricular programs?
  • What steps can be taken to ensure that upper administrators not only buy into the initiatives of the art/design unit, but become stalwart opponents of skepticisms often voiced regarding the value of art and design study, and champions of art and design initiatives?
  • What steps can art/design administrators take to build circles of supportive allies and how can these allies be enlisted to place their support behind art and design initiatives?

With regard to the faculty:

  • How can the art/design administrator empower the faculty to embrace, support, and promote the vision of the art/design unit?
  • What steps must be taken to encourage the faculty to think critically about the effectiveness of existing curricular programs?
  • What steps can be taken to challenge the faculty to think about the future of art and design study, and the conditions that must prevail to ensure the ongoing relevance of the fields of art and design?

With regard to students:

  • How can a sense of community and responsibility be established among students?
  • Should the students’ voice inform curricular design? If so, how?
  • How might administrators assist students to realize and recognize that various aspects associated with the acquisition of knowledge and skills will serve them regardless of the paths they pursue after graduation?

10:45 a.m. 12:15 p.m.

Briefing: Federal Issues for Art and Design Administrators

Under the law, the federal government does not control higher education. However, the federal government does play a major role in developing conditions for the work of higher education, primarily through laws and regulations defining conditions for institutional participation in grant and student loan programs, and tax policies that influence economic conditions affecting education and the arts.

Following a brief introduction to the higher education and policy landscapes, this session will address the current political climate; various pressures on institutions; and current and prospective federal policies, laws, and regulations affecting higher education and the arts.

This briefing will take a non-partisan policy analysis approach, looking at the ramifications and costs of various options and probabilities. Time for questions and discussion will be provided.

10:45 a.m. 12:15 p.m.

Creating Cogent Commission Communications

Whether developing and preparing comprehensive applications for accreditation and reaccreditation, Responses, Progress Reports, or applications for Plan Approval, Final Approval for Listing, or Substantive Change, clear and cogent material, which articulates activities at the institution while at the same time addresses standards issues, is necessary in order to conduct a successful conversation with the Commission on Accreditation. This session will offer an overview of the Handbook and the use of its contents in preparing Commission correspondence. Helpful ideas and suggestions will be provided for attendees in the process of, or planning to, develop materials for Commission review.

10:45 a.m. 12:15 p.m.

Briefing for NASAD Evaluators

This annual briefing is offered for individuals currently trained and serving as NASAD visiting evaluators. It will provide an opportunity for evaluators to refresh their knowledge of NASAD procedures, protocols, and standards, with particular focus on recent changes to the Procedures and the Handbook. Helpful reminders regarding the format, preparation, and required content of Visitors’ Reports will be provided. The potential impact of the activities of external constituencies, such as the federal government, states, and other review bodies, which may impact the accreditation process, will be discussed. Documentation required of institutions and evaluators will be highlighted, as well as sources and uses of helpful and informative publications aimed to assist institutions in the preparation of Self-Studies and evaluators in the preparation of Visitors’ Reports.

Please note: This session is by invitation only. Institutional representatives interested in becoming NASAD evaluators are encouraged to contact the National Office staff for consideration for training in 2020.

12:30 p.m.

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Adjournment of the NASAD Annual Meeting